Michael Lacey’s Math Breakthroughs Have Changed The World

Can math change the world? Yes, it can! But to make that happen you need brilliant number-crunchers who can delve deeply into equations, unlock their secrets and make whole new meanings emerge. Read more: Michael Lacey |Math Alliance and Michael Lacey | Wikipedia

Once man with such a talent in Michael T. Lacey. Throughout his career, Lacey has solved some of the most difficult problems in mathematics. In that process, he has provided practical, real-world applications that have made breakthroughs in applied technology possible.

Michael Lacey began blazing his trail across the universe of numbers when he earned his doctorate degree in mathematics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1987. He was fortunate to have worked under the direction of the world renowned Austrian mathematician Walter Philip.

After earning his Ph.D under the guidance of Dr. Philip, Lacey would work with his mentor again to produce another breakthrough – providing a solution for the “almost sure central limit theorem.” This solution has significant real-world applications. Learn more about Michael Lacey: https://www.math.gatech.edu/people/michael-lacey and https://www.genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu/id.php?id=62509

For example, it explains why bell curves appear in statistics, and the bell curve is one of the most-used tools across a variety of application when gathering data about all kinds of things, from world population trends to happenings in agriculture.

Another important area of work for Lacey was his research into Hilbert transform, a field closely connected to Fourier transform. Information gleaned from this body of mathematics has enormous implications for the way electronic data is transmitted.

In a world that depends upon on the flow of information, it is impossible to underestimate the value of what Lacey was able to accomplish in our understanding of Hilbert transform. He earned a well-deserved Salem Prize, one of the most prestigious honors in mathematics.

Today, Lacey remains on the cutting edge of math at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He joined the staff there in 2004. At GIT, Lacey was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is working with Dr. Xiaochun Li on math issues as they relate to certain engineering applications.

Once again, Lacey is proving that math is more than just numbers on a page, but a practical science that can make critical technologies possible.